icelandic economy

Iceland & Energy – presentation w. John Perkins

Just finished my previously mentioned presentation on Icelandic energy data. Some 250-300 people showed up – mostly to listen to John Perkins obviously.

Interesting audience to say the least, but a lot of fun!

My DataMarket piece went well – and putting it together at least helped me put some things in perspective. The slides are included below. As before, full screen viewing is recommended. Enjoy:

Iceland & Energy: Upcoming presentation

I have been invited – on behalf of DataMarket – to give a presentation at the University of Iceland on April 6th.

The occasion is a small conference due to the visit of “Economic Hit ManJohn Perkins to Iceland. Perkins is here to attend the premiere of “Dreamland“, a documentary on the effects that large-scale energy projects – especially for aluminum smelting – have had on the Icelandic economy and society in general.

My role will be to present data on the Icelandic energy sector and try to visualize some of the developments that can be seen in this data. I’ll try to cover some of the developments the film talks about, but also the obvious benefits that an abundance of renewable energy brings. I’ve already seen several data sets that give us laymen an interesting perspective on these things.

As a teaser I include below a few slides on the history of electricity generation in Iceland associated with key milestones in the building of our power plants. Be there on April 6th for more 🙂

(Full screen viewing recommended)

Icesave and Icelandic deposits

As DataMarket‘s Money:Tech gig (see previous entry) approaches, we’re starting to see all sorts of interesting data coming together to form our “DataMarket on the Icelandic Economy”.

Some graphs just speak for themselves. Here’s one that caught my eye today:

deposits-icesave1

The numbers are millions ISK.

Note that these are only deposits in Icelandic banks and their immediate branch offices, not the subsidiaries of Icelandic banks registered elsewhere. It therefore only includes Icesave (UK and Netherlands) and a minority of Kaupthing Edge’s operations (Finland, Norway, Germany and Austria). See here.

We’ve marked the month Icesave is opened (UK branch). Another interesting breaking point in the graph is in early 2008. Guess what? Icesave Netherlands was started in May 2008. So, just before the crash – foreign depositors held more than half of “Icelandic” deposits (1,710 billion ISK out of a total of 3,123 billion)!

In our upcoming tool, users will be able to view and correlate a wealth of Icelandic economy time series and mark them with events and news headlines interactively. It will be a pretty powerful tool!